Demonstrations, Lectures and Workshops

For rates and availability call (802) 579-0049 or email vlongtoe@vtindigenous.com

 

Twining Demonstration

Join Vera as she tells how her ancestors twined and how she learned to prepare the cordage from wild plants as a child. She also demonstrates the various ties that are used to make twined fabric. This demonstration is very well suited to venues and events with a lot of foot traffic. Spectators can stop and watch, listen and ask questions based on their specific interests.

 


Introduction to Twining

In this beginner level class, learn to twine by making a small project, such as a bookmark or bracelet, which you get to bring home.  These skills can then be applied toward making a belt or strap.  Class size is limited.

 

Learn to Twine a Bag
Learn to twine a bag from plant fibers. Several twining techniques will be taught. These skills can then be applied toward making a larger twined bag.  It is strongly suggested that this workshop be done in 2 to 3 sessions. This class will be offered in 2 sessions at the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum.  Check there website  details.  (Photograph Courtesy of Lina Longtoe Schulmeisters)


Fiber Arts in the Northeast (Lecture)

Native American Issues (Lecture)

 

 

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Eastern Woodland Cooking Class or Cooking Demonstration
Learn how to prepare a traditional Abenaki meal. During this workshop your group will: gather firewood, start a fire, pound corn, prepare and mix ingredients which you will cook outdoors, over a open fire. Afterward, relax and feast on the fruits of your labor. This is not a kosher or vegetarian meal. Cooking class can be adapted to an indoor kitchen. (Photograph Courtesy of Lina Longtoe Schulmeisters)

 

Native American Cooking Demonstration
This demonstration is very well suited to outdoor venues and events with a lot of foot traffic. Spectators can stop and watch, listen and ask questionsSpectators see the preparation of a traditional Abenaki meal, includes fire starting, pounding corn and cooking meal.

 

Native American Beading Class

Participants will learn two beading techniques used by the 18th and 19th century Eastern Woodland Indians.  You will create either a 4" x 5" pouch (that can be used to hold a cell phone, IDs credit cards, or money) or a case for your eyeglasses.  

 

Sew an Abenaki Hood
In the 18th and 19th centuries, Abenaki women were easily identified by the"peeked hoods" they wore.  During this class you will be provided with the wool and silk ribbon instruction to create your own Abenaki style hood.  You will cut out your pattern, sew the hood together and start edging it with silk ribbon.  

 

Email Vera at vlongtoe@vtindigenous.com